Sod Installation & Repair

 

Coastal Quality proudly serves Sarasota, Desoto, Charlotte & Lee counties with Sod Repair and Replacement service. We survey your property, conduct soil samples if necessary and forecast your maintenance cost to help you decide what sod best fits your needs. Coastal Quality recommends the following types of turf based on our experience and the results attained when placing them to practice in our service area.

Floratam-

St Augustine type grass, warm season grass is an improved St. Augustine grass that was released jointly in 1973 by the University of Florida and Texas A & M University. 'Floratam' is the most widely produced and used St. Augustine grass in Florida. It is a coarse-textured cultivar that has poor cold and shade tolerance relative to other St. Augustine grass cultivars. It does not persist well in environments that receive less than 6 hours of sunlight daily. It grows vigorously in the spring and summer. It should be mowed to a height of 3.5–4 inches. Floratam produces a green dense turf that is well adapted to most soils and climatic regions in Florida and to a relatively wide range of soil pH. Establishes quickly and easily and may be planted as sod, sprigs, or plugs. Requires water to remain green and healthy and may require supplemental irrigation during extended dry periods. It does not hold up to repeated foot or vehicular traffic. It goes into winter dormancy in parts of the state and turns a brown or tan color until springtime. The major insect pest is the chinch bug, which can cause considerable damage if left untreated. Weed control can be challenging, particularly when trying to control persistent, grassy weeds.

Bitterblue-

St Augustine type grass, warm season grass was selected in the 1930s. Although 'Bitterblue' is marketed as a certified cultivar, there is no certified 'Bitterblue' germplasm maintained by turf grass breeders at this time. What is typically sold as 'Bitterblue' has a relatively fine, dense texture and dark blue-green color. It has good cold and shade tolerance, but is not resistant to chinch bugs or gray leaf spot. It should be mowed to a height of 3.5–4 inches. Bitterblue produces a blue-green dense turf that is well adapted to most soils and climatic regions in Florida and to a relatively wide range of soil pH. Establishes quickly and easily and may be planted as sod, sprigs, or plugs. Requires water to remain green and healthy and may require supplemental irrigation during extended dry periods. It does not hold up to repeated foot or vehicular traffic. The major insect pest is the chinch bug, which can cause considerable damage if left untreated. Weed control can be challenging, particularly when trying to control persistent, grassy weeds.

Bahiagrass-

Bahiagrass was introduced from Brazil in 1914. It was originally used as a pasture grass on the sandy soils of the southeastern United States. Bahia grass is a popular, low-maintenance lawn grass that does well with limited water and fertilizer inputs. Although Bahia grass does not produce a carpet-like, dense lawn like some other warm-season lawn grasses, it does provide a good, low-maintenance lawn where slightly reduced visual quality is acceptable. It sustains better than other grasses in infertile, sandy soils and does not require high inputs of water or fertilizer. This makes it a good choice for home sites on large lots or acreage or for anywhere that there is no irrigation system. Bahia grass prefers acidic soils, such as those found in the central area of much of the state. It may be grown from seed, which is abundant and relatively cheap, but may take some time to germinate and provide cover. It may also be established from sod. Bahia grass can reseed itself from the seed heads that it produces, especially during the long days of summer. It has relatively few disease and insect problems. Bahia grass forms tall, unsightly seed heads throughout the spring, summer, and fall months that many find objectionable. This necessitates regular mowing to keep the stalks from becoming too tall. The seed stems are tough and can wear out mower blades, requiring them to be sharpened frequently. Bahia grass does not grow well in high-pH soils, such as those found in coastal areas, and therefore is not a good choice for these areas. High pH tends to cause yellowing of leaf tissue due to iron deficiency. Bahia grass has few insect problems, but it is susceptible to mole crickets. It does not have good tolerance for shade, traffic, or saltwater. Bahia grass grows in an open growth habit, which can result in weed encroachment into sparse areas. It has a coarse leaf texture and provides less cushioning for recreational activities than some other species. Bahia grass does best in full sun.

Zoysia-

Zoysia grasses were introduced into the United States from Asia and provide attractive turf throughout much of the United States. In recent years, dramatic improvements in Zoysia grass have been made by turf grass breeders. These improvements include insect resistance, accelerated establishment, and overall perfor­mance. They provide an extremely dense sod that resists weed invasion, but certain pests can be problematic. Zoysia grass maintenance is different from that of other Florida lawn grasses. When improper maintenance prac­tices are followed, undesirable results are likely to occur. Empire is a cultivar that is gaining popularity in Florida. It has a very dense growth habit, it maintains a nice green color and compared to other new Zoysia grass cultivars, it has a moderate rate of establishment. Empire has performed well in sandy and clay soil types with aggressive growth from its stolons and rhizomes, but it can be mowed with a standard rotary mower due to its broader leaf and open growth habit. It does not do well in shade. Empire is being planted in numerous communities in Florida and seems to do well in many areas throughout the state.

Follow Us On